Tag Archives: Recommendation

*Review* Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo

Gener: Adult Fantasy
Published: October 8, 2019
My Rating: 4.5/5

Goodreads Synopsis:
Galaxy “Alex” Stern is the most unlikely member of Yale’s freshman class. Raised in the Los Angeles hinterlands by a hippie mom, Alex dropped out of school early and into a world of shady drug dealer boyfriends, dead-end jobs, and much, much worse. By age twenty, in fact, she is the sole survivor of a horrific, unsolved multiple homicides. Some might say she’s thrown her life away. But at her hospital bed, Alex is offered a second chance: to attend one of the world’s most elite universities on a full ride. What’s the catch, and why her?

Still searching for answers to this herself, Alex arrives in New Haven tasked by her mysterious benefactors with monitoring the activities of Yale’s secret societies. These eight windowless “tombs” are well-known to be haunts of the future rich and powerful, from high-ranking politicos to Wall Street and Hollywood’s biggest players. But their occult activities are revealed to be more sinister and more extraordinary than any paranoid imagination might conceive.

                        My Thoughts

Admittedly, this was my first foray into Bardugo’s works, and – as I’ve since learned – she’s rather celebrated and idolized YA author. With that in mind, I understand some reviewers’ shock and distress over the ‘dark’ and ‘gore’ of Ninth House. Adult literature is a far cry from YA, so if you’re all excited to see Bardugo’s name on this one, maybe proceed with caution. Ninth House starts unapologetically with a scene of chaos and blood and I admire this YA author’s in-your-face approach to warn her devoted young readers of what’s to come and this new direction of hers.

Ninth House takes you somewhere unexpected. Beneath the gothic-revival towers, brownstone clad libraries and manicured lawns of Yale; insidious meetings of black-robed clad elites are held. Bardugo takes the reader down into the shadows and amongst the societies that are manipulating the world; foretelling stock market crashes, creating some of the most creative and influential minds of history, disrupting physics and the natural laws and doing it all in the midst of a bunch of college kids. And like any group of invincible-minded youth, there’s scandal, drugs, lies, unnecessarily on-point frat boy revulsion and, of course, murder. What college experience is complete without, amIright?
We follow the story of Alex Stern, a girl with more than a bit of a past, who is inducted into this world beneath Yale’s prestigious gleam because of a ‘talent’ she has for seeing what others deem isn’t there. Riddled with unlikeable traits and a questionable moral compass, Alex is forced to transition from ignorant rookie to full-fledged gatekeeper against the magic of this dark world and the unsuspecting students that walk above it. The narrative unravels between seasons to connect the present with the ramifications of the past drawing on the development and the re-emergence of old, less subtle habits Alex has as she navigates this new world and a murder case that runs deeper than anyone anticipates.

Warning: Toeing the waters of violence and vulgarity, Ninth House deals with some adult themes, such as PTSD and abuse and may be triggers for some, so this book isn’t for everyone.

I found Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo to be a somber and thrilling read – a slow burn that leaves you feeling the heat long after you’ve closed the pages. It’s a story brimming with ancient mysteries, ghosts, magic, powerful relics and the promise of danger that takes its time weaving a plot that is sure to spin you around on more than one occasion. Although my impressions of our main heroine, Alex Stern were lackluster, to say the least, I did enjoy Bardugo’s ability to paint diverse and formidable characters that are able to threaten a reader’s expectation of what a protagonist is. Everything felt very intentional and the writing perfectly emphasized and complemented the dark, atmospheric vibe of the plot.

All in all, I liked this book but found that I wasn’t invested in the characters. That said, I definitely acknowledge the potential. There was a lot of build-up here. Lots of explanations and world-building, and going in not having it in my mind that I was reading the first of a potential series definitely had me theorizing about where this story could go next. The ending screams “more to come” and I look forward to watching this story progress somewhere more plot-driven now that all that groundwork has been laid. It’s clear that Bardugo still has many layers to this world to unwrap and mysteries she’s carefully bookmarked for later.

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*Review* The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

Genre: Psychological Thriller
Published: March 5, 2019
My rating: 5/5

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Goodreads Synopsis:
Alicia Berenson’s life is seemingly perfect. A famous painter married to an in-demand fashion photographer, she lives in a grand house with big windows overlooking a park in one of London’s most desirable areas. One evening her husband Gabriel returns home late from a fashion shoot, and Alicia shoots him five times in the face, and then never speaks another word.

Alicia’s refusal to talk, or give any kind of explanation, turns a domestic tragedy into something far grander, a mystery that captures the public imagination and casts Alicia into notoriety. The price of her art skyrockets, and she, the silent patient, is hidden away from the tabloids and spotlight at the Grove, a secure forensic unit in North London.

Theo Faber is a criminal psychotherapist who has waited a long time for the opportunity to work with Alicia. His determination to get her to talk and unravel the mystery of why she shot her husband takes him down a twisting path into his own motivations—a search for the truth that threatens to consume him….

                      My Thoughts

This was a fantastic book. The kind that makes you want to wake up the person beside you to tell them all the gory details at 3am. May or may not be a direct reflection of life…

Anyways! I loved this book!

Talk about engaging! The premise alone had me cocking an eyebrow. A woman is incarcerated for brutally murdering her husband in cold blood with what appears to be no motive in sight. And what’s more sensational about it, is her pledge to silence following the arrest. The murder can’t be confirmed, denied, interrogated or explained. The evidence speaks for itself though… she’s found holding the gun. The husband is found tied to a chair with his face blown off.

But why??

To say this book caught me off guard would be an understatement. The characters are richly explored – no one has a repeating voice. No two are the same. The writing is crisp and clean. Phrasing is important, tenses even more so. Michaelides does a fantastic job of leading the readers’ eye where he wants it without throwing disingenuous redirections and ‘clues’ as to how the book may end. I didn’t know where it was going and that kept me rapt to turn those pages. There’s a feeling of well-researched content all the way through that encourages the reader to become fully immersed and the quick-pace makes this book an easy one to devour.

I’m cutting this review there. Because trust me, that’s enough. Go get this one. You’ll want to hear the Silent Patient’s story for yourself.

*Review* Black Leopard Red Wolf by Marlon James

Genre: Fantasy
Publication: February 5, 2019
My Rating: 4/5

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Goodreads Synopsis:
In the first novel in Marlon James’s Dark Star trilogy, myth, fantasy, and history come together to explore what happens when a mercenary is hired to find a missing child.

Tracker is known far and wide for his skills as a hunter: “He has a nose,” people say. Engaged to track down a mysterious boy who disappeared three years earlier, Tracker breaks his own rule of always working alone when he finds himself part of a group that comes together to search for the boy. The band is a hodgepodge, full of unusual characters with secrets of their own, including a shape-shifting man-animal known as Leopard.

Drawing from African history and mythology and his own rich imagination, Marlon James has written an adventure that’s also an ambitious, involving read. Defying categorization and full of unforgettable characters, Black Leopard, Red Wolf explores the fundamentals of truths, the limits of power, the excesses of ambition, and our need to understand them all.

                          My Thoughts

There are few fantasy novels that can do what Marlon James accomplished with this much-anticipated first release of the even more anticipated Dark Star trilogy to come. It’s a story that felt as simultaneously ancient as it was ageless. Black Leopard Red Wolf took me to an otherworldly Africa where unexpected crevices of African mythology and history pressed and pushed and bullied me into uncomfortably intense prose. Following a band of mercenaries, anti-heroes, and shapeshifters, the story unfurls around a quest to reunite a mother and her son. Continue reading *Review* Black Leopard Red Wolf by Marlon James

*Review* The Best Kind Of People by Zoe Whittall

“For months Joan would replay this moment, trying to decipher the look on her husband’s face. Was it guilt? Confusion? Indignation? Stoicism? Acting? But nothing, not even a revolving camera of omniscience, a floating momentary opportunity to narrate, would allow anyone to truly understand the truth about George. He became a hard statue, an obstacle, a symbol. // The father and the husband, from that moment, had been transformed.”

Outside, the leaves appeared to have reddened overnight, going mad alongside her.”

There’s been a hype surrounding this book since it hit shelves in August of 2016 and I’m glad to report that it was able to live up to the deserved acclaim. Strong writing, uniquely real and wonderfully flawed characters and a story that’s both controversial and timely enough to drag even the most hesitant reader in makes for an addictive read.

Zoe Whittall’s, The Best Kind of People explores the complexity and complications surrounding t51ee79o8tflhe culture of rape and what family means while questioning ultimately what makes a person ‘good.’

Continue reading *Review* The Best Kind Of People by Zoe Whittall